Tag Archives: kentucky

Regulation of the Day 186: Missing Children

Paige Johnson, 17, has been missing since September. Her grandmother, Jenny Roderick of Covington, Kentucky, spends most of her spare time putting up missing person posters with Paige’s picture all over the area. Maybe somebody saw her on the street. Maybe somebody knows something. Anything to get her granddaughter back.

Covington police promptly ordered Roderick to stop putting up fliers on city property.

City regulations prohibit putting fliers on utility poles. The Daily Mail reports that “While insisting that the city has ‘no intention of being insensitive to her family,’ the city manager said that regardless of what the posters say, they have to come down because they break city ordinances.”

Here’s hoping that Paige turns up safe and sound. Until then, Covington police might want to let this code violation slide.

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Friday Regulation Roundup

Some of the stranger governmental goings-on I dug up over the week:

-The federal government is spending $73m this year on the Agricultural Water Enhancement Program.

-The federal government has 5,647 words of formaldehyde regulations for the workplace.

-The federal government has an Arthritis Advisory Committee. They’re meeting on May 12 if you care to attend.

-Government spends $2,000,000 on phone lines for a town of 80 people, some of whom already own satellite dishes.

OSHA considers sand a poison because it contains silica.

-Vermont to spend $150,000 to build a tunnel for salamanders to cross a road safely.

-The federal government has a Highbush Blueberry Council.

-A fish hatchery in South Dakota is getting $20,000 in stimulus money for new light fixtures.

-In Virginia, it is illegal in many instances to turn on your air conditioning before May 1. Cato’s Tom Firey has more.

EPA says that de-icing fluid for windshields is an environmental hazard. Worried airline pilots say the EPA is the real safety hazard.

-It is illegal in Kentucky for anyone under 18 to play pool without photo ID and written parental consent.