Category Archives: Taxation

Unemployment, Taxes, and Spending

Alongside Charles W. Baird, whose writing I have enjoyed since my high school and college days in FEE’s The Freeman magazine (then called Ideas on Liberty), I am quoted in a Heartland Institute piece on unemployment and how to keep it low.

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Official Disdain for Commerce

Most cultures have held trade and commerce in low regard. This is true in nearly all times and places, and whether people are rich or poor, religious or secular, and cuts across political beliefs. Governments don’t much like the merchant class either, even though this disdain is biting the hand that feeds. James C. Scott provides an example from ancient China on p. 131 of his thought-provoking 2017 book Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States:

One reason for the official distrust and stigmatization of the merchant class in China was the simple fact that its wealth, unlike that of the rice planter, was illegible, concealable, and fugitive. One might tax a market, or collect tolls on a road or river junction where goods and transactions were more transparent, but taxing merchants was a tax collector’s nightmare.

Suing the IRS – And Winning

Proving that sometimes good guys can win, our friends at the Institute for Justice are celebrating a big win against the IRS. In a move supported by large, established tax preparation firms, the IRS tried to require all tax preparers to get licenses. The licenses, along with other requirements such as annual continuing education courses, would raise costs for smaller firms and put many individual preparers out of business entirely; one sees why large firms would welcome the extra burden. They would face less competition. IJ sued to put a stop to his perfidy and preserve a more open competitive process.

A few years ago, before IJ filed its lawsuit, now-CEI Adjunct Scholar Caleb Brown and I co-authored an op-ed warning why mandatory tax preparer licenses are a bad idea:

Since the IRS has the power to revoke registrations, tax preparers will have to be careful not to advocate too aggressively for their clients. Besides this chilling effect, mandatory registration reduces consumer choice.

There are at least 600,000 unregistered preparers. Many of them are retirees. Others have jobs, but prepare taxes on the side to help make ends meet. Still others are volunteers. They give their services for free to people who can’t afford a tax preparer. How many will give up, rather than jump through the proposed regulatory hoops?

The IRS estimates the total cost of the new regulations at $48.5 million, plus 1.71 million hours of paperwork and record-keeping burdens. That’s equivalent to 855 full-time jobs — and not the kind that will spark an economic recovery.

Read the whole piece here. Read more about IJ’s victory here, and see a short video they produced about the case here.

CEI Podcast for December 5, 2013: Ending Corporate Welfare

corporate welfare
Have a listen here.

Stephen Slivinski, a senior economist at the Goldwater Institute, discusses solutions to the seemingly intractable problem of corporate welfare.

CEI Podcast for November 7, 2013: A Prohibitive Excise Tax

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Have a listen here.

A new CEI study finds that the most expensive ingredient in beer isn’t grain, hops, or equipment: it’s taxes. Study co-author and Fellow in Consumer Policy Studies Michelle Minton has more on the problem, and how and how two bills currently before Congress might solve it.

CEI Podcast for July 2, 2013: The True Story of European Austerity

europe satellite night
Have a listen here.

Warren Brookes Fellow Matthew Melchiorre discusses his new study, which finds that, despite the prevailing narrative of severe austerity across Europe, only 4 countries out of 27 have actually cut taxes and spending.

Now it’s Getting Serious

From Politico: “The IRS softball team in Washington canceled a game scheduled for Friday against a team from Texas Sen. John Cornyn’s office and wasn’t able to reschedule.”

The plot thickens.