Category Archives: regulation

This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

While the nation celebrated Thanksgiving with family and friends, rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from almond information to missile accidents.

On to the data:

  • Last week, 41 new final regulations were published in the Federal Register, after 59 the previous week.
  • That’s the equivalent of a new regulation every four hours and six minutes.
  • Federal agencies have issued 2,735 final regulations in 2019. At that pace, there will be 2,960 new final regulations. Last year’s total was 3,367 regulations.
  • Last week, agencies published 396 notices, for a total of 20,046 in 2019. At that pace, there will be 21,695 new notices this year. Last year’s total was 21,656.
  • Last week, 1,200 new pages were added to the Federal Register, after 1,135 pages the previous week.
  • The 2019 Federal Register totals 65,905 pages. It is on pace for 71,326 pages. The 2018 total was 68,302 pages. The all-time record adjusted page count (which subtracts skips, jumps, and blank pages) is 96,994, set in 2016.
  • Rules are called “economically significant” if they have costs of $100 million or more in a given year. Four such rules have been published this year. Five such rules were published in 2018.
  • The running cost tally for 2019’s economically significant regulations currently ranges from savings of $4.39 billion to $4.08 billion, mostly from estimated savings on federal spending. The 2018 total ranges from net costs of $220.1 million to $2.54 billion, depending on discount rates and other assumptions.
  • Agencies have published 65 final rules meeting the broader definition of “significant” so far this year. 2018’s total was 108 significant final rules.
  • So far in 2019, 458 new rules affect small businesses; 21 of them are classified as significant. 2018’s totals were 660 rules affecting small businesses, with 29 of them significant.

Highlights from last week’s new final regulations:

For more data, see “Ten Thousand Commandments” and follow @10KC and @RegoftheDay on Twitter.

This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

Congress averted a government shutdown until December 20th by passing a continuing resolution. The Fall 2019 Unified Agenda was also released, which compiles all rulemaking agencies’ upcoming plans. Wayne Crews has more on that. Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from college radio to redesignating unclassifiable areas.

On to the data:

  • Last week, 59 new final regulations were published in the Federal Register, after 49 the previous week.
  • That’s the equivalent of a new regulation every two hours and 51 minutes.
  • Federal agencies have issued 2,665 final regulations in 2019. At that pace, there will be 2,936 new final regulations. Last year’s total was 3,367 regulations.
  • Last week, agencies published 454 notices, for a total of 19,650 in 2019. At that pace, there will be 21,641 new notices this year. Last year’s total was 21,656.
  • Last week, 1,135 new pages were added to the Federal Register, after 2,680 pages the previous week.
  • The 2019 Federal Register totals 64,701 pages. It is on pace for 71,257 pages. The 2018 total was 68,302 pages. The all-time record adjusted page count (which subtracts skips, jumps, and blank pages) is 96,994, set in 2016.
  • Rules are called “economically significant” if they have costs of $100 million or more in a given year. Four such rules have been published this year. Five such rules were published in 2018.
  • The running cost tally for 2019’s economically significant regulations currently ranges from savings of $4.39 billion to $4.08 billion, mostly from estimated savings on federal spending. The 2018 total ranges from net costs of $220.1 million to $2.54 billion, depending on discount rates and other assumptions.
  • Agencies have published 61 final rules meeting the broader definition of “significant” so far this year. 2018’s total was 108 significant final rules.
  • So far in 2019, 444 new rules affect small businesses; 20 of them are classified as significant. 2018’s totals were 660 rules affecting small businesses, with 29 of them significant.

Highlights from last week’s new final regulations:

For more data, see “Ten Thousand Commandments” and follow @10KC and @RegoftheDay on Twitter.

This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

The 2019 Federal Register has already exceeded its page count during President Trump’s first year in office, with more than a month to spare and almost no activity in the month of January due to the federal shutdown. On a four-day week, three days’ editions of the Federal Register exceed 600 pages, and Friday’s edition was 1,133 pages. An average day’s edition is under 300 pages. The Fall 2019 Unified Agenda is also yet to come out. This week, Congress will likely avoid another shutdown by passing another Continuing Resolution to fund the government through an as-yet undetermined date. Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from serial registration to engines that don’t move.

On to the data:

  • Last week, 49 new final regulations were published in the Federal Register, after 58 the previous week.
  • That’s the equivalent of a new regulation every three hours and 26 minutes.
  • Federal agencies have issued 2,606 final regulations in 2019. At that pace, there will be 2,948 new final regulations. Last year’s total was 3,367 regulations.
  • Last week, agencies published 317 notices, for a total of 19,196 in 2019. At that pace, there will be 21,715 new notices this year. Last year’s total was 21,656.
  • Last week, 2,680 new pages were added to the Federal Register, after 1,591 pages the previous week.
  • The 2019 Federal Register totals 63,563 pages. It is on pace for 71,904 pages. The 2018 total was 68,302 pages. The all-time record adjusted page count (which subtracts skips, jumps, and blank pages) is 96,994, set in 2016.
  • Rules are called “economically significant” if they have costs of $100 million or more in a given year. Four such rules have been published this year. Five such rules were published in 2018.
  • The running cost tally for 2019’s economically significant regulations currently ranges from savings of $4.39 billion to $4.08 billion, mostly from estimated savings on federal spending. The 2018 total ranges from net costs of $220.1 million to $2.54 billion, depending on discount rates and other assumptions.
  • Agencies have published 59 final rules meeting the broader definition of “significant” so far this year. 2018’s total was 108 significant final rules.
  • So far in 2019, 436 new rules affect small businesses; 20 of them are classified as significant. 2018’s totals were 660 rules affecting small businesses, with 29 of them significant.

Highlights from last week’s new final regulations:

For more data, see Ten Thousand Commandments and follow @10KC and @RegoftheDay on Twitter.

This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

The number of new regulations this year passed 2,500 last week, and the Federal Register surpassed 60,000 pages. This week could see big news on everything from a possible trade deal with China to impeachment testimony. Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from handling Florida tomatoes to rural telephone banks.

On to the data:

  • Last week, 58 new final regulations were published in the Federal Register, after 55 the previous week.
  • That’s the equivalent of a new regulation every two hours and 54 minutes.
  • Federal agencies have issued 2,557 final regulations in 2019. At that pace, there will be 2,946 new final regulations. Last year’s total was 3,367 regulations.
  • Last week, agencies published 370 notices, for a total of 18,879 in 2019. At that pace, there will be 21,750 new notices this year. Last year’s total was 21,656.
  • Last week, 1,591 new pages were added to the Federal Register, after 1,685 pages the previous week.
  • The 2019 Federal Register totals 60,881 pages. It is on pace for 70,140 pages. The 2018 total was 68,302 pages. The all-time record adjusted page count (which subtracts skips, jumps, and blank pages) is 96,994, set in 2016.
  • Rules are called “economically significant” if they have costs of $100 million or more in a given year. Four such rules have been published this year. Five such rules were published in 2018.
  • The running cost tally for 2019’s economically significant regulations currently ranges from savings of $4.39 billion to $4.08 billion, mostly from estimated savings on federal spending. The 2018 total ranges from net costs of $220.1 million to $2.54 billion, depending on discount rates and other assumptions.
  • Agencies have published 59 final rules meeting the broader definition of “significant” so far this year. 2018’s total was 108 significant final rules.
  • So far in 2019, 424 new rules affect small businesses; 20 of them are classified as significant. 2018’s totals were 660 rules affecting small businesses, with 29 of them significant.

Highlights from last week’s new final regulations:

For more data, see Ten Thousand Commandments and follow @10KC and @RegoftheDay on Twitter.

This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

Washington had one of its best weeks in recent memory. The Nationals won the World Series, and the House is out of session until November 12. Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from the new Domestic Hemp Production Program to snack font size.

On to the data:

  • Last week, 55 new final regulations were published in the Federal Register, same as the 55 from the previous week.
  • That’s the equivalent of a new regulation every three hours and three minutes.
  • Federal agencies have issued 2,499 final regulations in 2019. At that pace, there will be 2,947 new final regulations. Last year’s total was 3,367 regulations.
  • Last week, agencies published 442 notices, for a total of 18,509 in 2019. At that pace, there will be 21,827 new notices this year. Last year’s total was 21,656.
  • Last week, 1,685 new pages were added to the Federal Register, after 1,503 pages the previous week.
  • The 2019 Federal Register totals 59,288 pages. It is on pace for 69,916                                                         pages. The 2018 total was 68,302 pages. The all-time record adjusted page count (which subtracts skips, jumps, and blank pages) is 96,994, set in 2016.
  • Rules are called “economically significant” if they have costs of $100 million or more in a given year. Four such rules have been published this year. Five such rules were published in 2018.
  • The running cost tally for 2019’s economically significant regulations currently ranges from savings of $4.39 billion to $4.08 billion, mostly from estimated savings on federal spending. The 2018 total ranges from net costs of $220.1 million to $2.54 billion, depending on discount rates and other assumptions.
  • Agencies have published 58 final rules meeting the broader definition of “significant” so far this year. 2018’s total was 108 significant final rules.
  • So far in 2019, 416 new rules affect small businesses; 20 of them are classified as significant. 2018’s totals were 660 rules affecting small businesses, with 29 of them significant.

Highlights from last week’s new final regulations:

For more data, see Ten Thousand Commandments and follow @10KC and @RegoftheDay on Twitter.

Spooky Halloween Regulations

Halloween is this week. That means costumes, spooky decorations, trick-or-treating, and pumpkin spice everything. The 185,434-page Code of Federal Regulations and its cousin, the United States Code, contain several rules to keep everything safe and tidy. Here are a few examples:

  • 16 CFR § 240.7 – As part of the 1936 Robinson-Patman Act, which is intended to prevent anti-competitive business practices, this antitrust regulation covers, among other things, manufacturers’ attempts to manipulate retailers’ product placement. This can include seasonally themed packaging for Halloween candy, special placement on aisle endcaps, and other promotional  considerations.
  • 21 CFR § 73.2995 – This covers reflective or glow-in-the-dark makeup for Halloween costumes. It may not contain more than 10 percent by weight luminescent zinc sulfide. It also must be “intended for use only on limited, infrequent occasions, e.g., Halloween, and not for regular or daily use.”
  • 16 CFR § 1610.1 – Flammability testing for costumes. It specifically exempts hats, gloves, footwear, and interlining fabrics.
  • 10 USC, Subtitle A, Part II, Chapter 45, Sections 771 and 772 specify that only USPS letter carriers may wear the official uniform. It is illegal to wear one for a Halloween costume. A 1970 court case,  Schact v. United States, carved out an exemption for “theatrical purposes.” Congress, operating on a slight lag, in 1990 changed Section 772 of the statute law to reflect the Court’s decision. There remains no Halloween costume exemption, so anyone dressing as Newman from “Seinfeld” does so at their own risk. For more on this regulation, see Mike Chase’s excellent new book, How to Become a Federal Criminal, pp. 16-21.
  • 40 CFR § 180.34 – Pesticide residue requirements for pumpkins.
  • The FDA has labeling requirements for canned pumpkins.

Countless other regulations maintain order during the rest of the year. For more on the size of the federal regulatory state, see Wayne Crews’s Ten Thousand Commandments 2019: An Annual Snapshot of the Federal Regulatory State.

This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

The Washington Nationals made it to the World Series, and the White House canceled some of its newspaper subscriptions. Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from eligible billfish to re-exporting goods to Cuba.

On to the data:

  • Last week, 55 new final regulations were published in the Federal Register, after 29 the previous week.
  • That’s the equivalent of a new regulation every three hours and three minutes.
  • Federal agencies have issued 2,444 final regulations in 2019. At that pace, there will be 2,952 new final regulations. Last year’s total was 3,367 regulations.
  • Last week, agencies published 480 notices, for a total of 18,067 in 2019. At that pace, there will be 21,821 new notices this year. Last year’s total was 21,656.
  • Last week, 1,503 new pages were added to the Federal Register, after 1,075 pages the previous week.
  • The 2019 Federal Register totals 57,600 pages. It is on pace for 69,566 pages. The 2018 total was 68,302 pages. The all-time record adjusted page count (which subtracts skips, jumps, and blank pages) is 96,994, set in 2016.
  • Rules are called “economically significant” if they have costs of $100 million or more in a given year. Four such rules have been published this year. Five such rules were published in 2018.
  • The running cost tally for 2019’s economically significant regulations currently ranges from savings of $4.39 billion to $4.08 billion, mostly from estimated savings on federal spending. The 2018 total ranges from net costs of $220.1 million to $2.54 billion, depending on discount rates and other assumptions.
  • Agencies have published 58 final rules meeting the broader definition of “significant” so far this year. 2018’s total was 108 significant final rules.
  • So far in 2019, 409 new rules affect small businesses; 20 of them are classified as significant. 2018’s totals were 660 rules affecting small businesses, with 29 of them significant.

Highlights from last week’s new final regulations:

For more data, see “Ten Thousand Commandments” and follow @10KC and @RegoftheDay on Twitter.