Category Archives: Media Appearances

On the Radio: Apple’s EU Antitrust Case

On Friday, I discussed the EU’s new antitrust case against Apple on the Lars Larson show. Audio is here.

In the News: Hawley’s Antitrust Bill

A Fox News writeup of Sen. Josh Hawley’s newest antitrust bill quotes my colleague Jessica Melugin and me:

“[H]is claims that the industry, ‘hasn’t been a success … for the American economy,’ don’t ring true for so many Americans that are employed by or invested in these economic powerhouses, not to mention the millions of consumers who enjoy tech products,” Jessica Melugin, the director of the Competitive Enterprise Institute’s (CEI) Center for Technology and Innovation, said of Hawley’s merger-banning legislation. 

CEI Senior Fellow Ryan Young called Hawley’s broader anti-tech efforts “feel-good populism” that is “just another culture war issue.”

Read the whole thing here.

More on the Corporate Tax

Andrew Stuttaford, who edits National Review‘s policy-focused Capital Matters section, has a writeup in his daily newsletter on the consequences of a corporate tax increase, in which he quotes from my recent piece that ran on his site. Andrew’s analysis is excellent, and detailed.

The Washington Examiner‘s Sarah Westwood quotes me in an article about the proposed increase.

The Dispatch, an outlet founded by Jonah Goldberg to offer a less tribal voice for the right than the Trump-centered outlets, was also nice enough to draw from my National Review piece in their daily newsletter (scroll down to the “worth your time” section”.

I also discussed corporate taxes on the Rod Arquette show in Salt Lake City. I’ll post a link to the audio if I find one.

CEI Event: Agenda for Congress

CEI hosted a launch event yesterday for our biennial Agenda for Congress. Sen. Rand Paul gave the keynote address. My colleagues Sean Higgins, Iain Murray, and I spoke about the Agenda‘s reforms for labor, trade, and regulatory policy, respectively.

The event is on YouTube here. The Agenda for Congress is here.

Event: Reviving America after a Year of Chaos

Yesterday I spoke on a panel discussion hosted by the Pacific Legal Foundation. The topic was opportunities and challenges for enacting sound policy in the year to come. PLF president Steven Anderson moderated, and the other panelists included the State Policy Network‘s Jennifer Butler and Greg Brooks of the Better Cities Project.

The event is viewable on YouTube here.

Minimum Wage Tradeoffs Go beyond Jobs

I’m quoted in a Daily Signal writeup on several policy issues the new administration will be active on in the coming months. My quote is on the minimum wage:

However, the economic impact isn’t limited to jobs, said Ryan Young, a senior fellow at the Washington, D.C.-based Competitive Enterprise Institute. 

“The biggest trade-off and negative effect would not be job loss, but non-wage pay decrease,” Young told The Daily Signal. “Employers would cut tuition payments, benefits, and it would mean more work for the employees if positions aren’t filled.”

Young added that the economic impact could be harsh, but noted that the average for state minimum-wage laws nationally is “in the neighborhood” of $12 per hour. So, the proposed increase itself for many states would not be more than double. 

Read the whole thing here.

On the Radio: Antitrust, Jobs, and More

On Monday, I talked about antitrust policy on Paul Molloy’s Freedom Works show based in Tampa, FL.

I also taped a conversation on Rick Trader’s Conservative Commandos show today where we discussed today’s jobs report, the COVID-19 recovery, antitrust policy, and other topics. It should air sometime soon.

I’ll post links to audio (and video for the Conservative Commandos segment) if I find them online.

Third Antitrust Suit against Google since October Based on Flawed Argument

This press release was originally posted on cei.org.

A coalition of more than 30 states and territories today filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, alleging the search engine has abused its power in markets ranging from voice assistants to digital advertising in an attempt to maintain a monopoly over internet searches. The antitrust lawsuit is the third filed against Google since October.

CEI Senior Fellow Ryan Young said:

“Today’s antitrust lawsuit, the third against Google since October, has a major flaw: the dozen keystrokes argument. It is not difficult to type bing.com or duckduckgo.com into your browser. Google pays Apple as much as $12 billion per year to Apple to have Google be its default search engine. This is apparently not enough to prevent Apple from reportedly building up its own search engine.

“Nor was Microsoft’s similar default status for its Internet Explorer browser enough to stave off competition from Firefox, Google Chrome, Apple Safari, and other browsers. Just as Microsoft never actually controlled the browser market, Google does not control the search market. Consumers do.”

Read more:

Recent Media Appearances

In early November, I was invited on Bob Zadek’s show for a thoughtful hour-long conversation on antitrust law. Audio and an AI-generated transcript are here.

In late October, I was on Jim Blasingame’s Small Business Advocates radio show, also to talk about antitrust.

Earlier this week, I spoke to One News Now’s Chris Woodward about regulations.

EU’s Antitrust Charges against Amazon at Odds with Reality

This is a press release originally posted at cei.org.

The European Commission today announced it was charging Amazon with antitrust violations, accusing the retailer of using data from third-party sellers to benefit its own retail offerings.

CEI senior fellow Ryan Young said:

“Whether intentionally or not, the EU’s antitrust case against Amazon is trade protectionism by another name, at a time when the global economy cannot afford it.

“It also falls for the relevant market fallacy. This is using fancy terminology to say that Amazon dominates an unrealistically narrow market. In this case, the EU argues that Amazon dominates ‘marketplace services’ and ‘online platforms.’ Amazon is, in fact, a low-margin retailer. And it has a roughly 1 percent global market share. It sells things in a variety of ways, and people can buy them in a variety of ways—or not, as they choose.

“Amazon has made retail more competitive. Amazon’s third-party seller services give smaller businesses access to a global market they did not previously have. Traditional large retailers, such as Walmart and Target in the U.S., have expanded their online options to compete against Amazon. So have grocery stores—which is important in the age of COVID. It is difficult to make an argument that these developments have harmed consumers or producers.”

Read more: