Category Archives: Media Appearances

On the Radio: Metal Tariffs and NAFTA/USMCA

I’ll appear on the Jim Bohannon Show tonight at 10:00 ET to talk about President Trump’s decision to ease steel and aluminum tariffs against Canada and Mexico, and how it will impact the NAFTA/USMCA trade agreement.

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China Retaliates to U.S. Tariff Increase

A story in Canada’s The Globe and Mail (unfortunately behind a subscription paywall), quotes me on the latest tariff increases in the U.S.-China trade war:

Ryan Young, a senior fellow at the free-market think tank, Competitive Enterprise Institute, said Mr. Trump’s negotiating strategy has “backfired badly” and he will have to change course to reach a resolution. Mr. Young said Congress should try to take away Mr. Trump’s authority to impose levies.
Mr. Young said better options for dealing with China’s behaviour would be suing Beijing through the World Trade Organization and joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a Pacific Rim trade pact meant to contain China’s influence.
“The President has the order wrong – he says ‘ready, fire, aim,’” Mr. Young said. “Trump can’t be trusted with tariff authority.”

Export-Import Bank Politics

Politico’s Zachary Warmbrodt has an excellent–and thorough–writeup on the current state of Export-Import Bank politics, covering all sides. He also quotes me at the end:

Conservative opponents of the bank are making clear they’ll resist entreaties by McHenry and others to bring them along for reauthorization.

“He’s not going to succeed with us — that’s for sure,” Competitive Enterprise Institute senior fellow Ryan Young said. “We’re standing by our principles.”

I’m a (classical) liberal, not a conservative, but the statement is still true. The more company, the merrier on that front, regardless of party.

Interview on the Case against Antitrust Law

Here is an interview I recently did on Wayne Crews’ and my paper on antitrust law. My segment starts at about the 57-minute mark.

The paper is here.

Republican Study Committee Releases 2020 Budget Proposal

Congress is supposed to pass an annual spending budget, though it rarely gets around to it. Instead, the government is usually funded through a mashup of individual appropriations bills, omnibus appropriations bills, and continuing resolutions. This makes government spending less transparent and less accountable. It also leaves the federal government vulnerable to shutdowns during political fights, which happened in January of this year.

Fortunately, the Republican Study Committee (RSC) has just issued a proposed budget. It is likely the only budget that will be introduced in Congress this year, though unlikely to pass a Democratic House. As with any issue-spanning document, one can quibble with its contents regardless of political persuasion. Still, the RSC deserves a great deal of credit for at least putting something out there.

Other parts of the GOP should also issue their own proposed budgets; unlike The Highlander, there can be more than one. Across the aisle, a Democratic budget(s) would face similar obstacles in a Republican Senate and White House. They still should release their own budgets to make their policy priorities more concrete.

The whole RSC FY 2020 Budget is here. The document cites CEI sources on a variety of issues:

  • Regulatory Reform. The budget gives an entire chapter to regulatory reform, beginning on page 17, and cites Wayne Crews’s Ten Thousand Commandments annual report—the 2019 edition of which will be released soon.
  • Energy and Environment. The budget’s recommendations for increasing North American energy production draw on the energy and environment chapter in CEI’s Agenda for the 116th Congress.
  • Export-Import Bank. On page 25, the budget would abolish the Export-Import Bank, citing my paper “Ten Reasons to Abolish the Export-Import Bank.” Ex-Im’s charter expires this September 30, and will close if Congress declines to reauthorize it.

Kudos to the RSC for putting out a tangible document that should serve as a starting point for debating federal priorities for the next fiscal year—and for attempting to fix a broken budget process. They also have excellent taste in finding sources for many of their ideas; interested readers can find more in CEI’s Free to Prosper: A Pro-Growth Agenda for the 116th Congress.

Increased Wage Compensation Means Decreased Non-Wage Compensation

My adoptive home state of Illinois recently decided to gradually increase its minimum wage to $15 per hour in 2025. Bethany Blankley at Watchdog.org has a writeup in which she quotes me on some of the non-wage tradeoffs that will accompany the wage increase:

Ryan Young, a fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI), a free market think tank in Washington, D.C., said that implementing a higher minimum wage “forces employers to reduce non-wage pay such as insurance, breaks and personal time off, free meals or parking, and more.”

The whole article is here.

McDonald’s and the Minimum Wage

McDonald’s recently announced it will decline to oppose minimum wage increases. The Washington Examiner‘s Sean Higgins has a good writeup about the decision, in which I am briefly quoted.