Category Archives: Media Appearances

Trump Administration Backs Down on Tariffs on Canada Aluminum, But Long-Term Problems Unfixed

This is a press release originally posted at cei.org.

In another high stakes trade matter today, the Trump administration decided to back down from plans to impose tariffs on Canadian aluminum. Just before Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was set to announce retaliatory tariffs against the United States, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer announced the U.S. would drop the tariffs. CEI Senior Fellow Ryan Young praised Lighthizer’s decision:

“United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer did the right thing by dropping the planned reinstatement of aluminum tariffs against Canada. The tariffs violated the spirit, if not the letter, of the just-enacted USMCA trade agreement. The agreement and its predecessor exist in large part to avoid the sort of brinksmanship between allies we just witnessed.

“The administration may finally be learning that other countries retaliate against tariffs. Just in case the lesson has not yet sunk in, Congress should pass legislation taking back the tariff-making powers it granted to the President under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962. Taxing power properly belongs with Congress, and this administration has proven it will not use its power responsibly.​”

WTO Rules Against Trump’s China Tariffs, but the Problem Remains the Tariffs Themselves

This is a press release orginally posted at cei.org.

The World Trade Organization ruled today that President Trump violated global trade rules by unilaterally imposing tariffs on over $350 billion worth of Chinese goods. CEI Senior Fellow Ryan Young says, while the WTO decision is not a surprise, the bigger problem remains the economic and personal toll of the tariffs themselves.

“It is no surprise the WTO found that President Trump’s China tariffs violate its rules. Ironically, the President cannot appeal this decision because he continued the Obama-era policy of crippling the WTO’s Appellate Board. 

“The China tariffs are still bad policy. The purpose of the tariffs was to force the Chinese government to reform its illiberal policies ranging from trade barriers to technology theft to its human rights record. Not a single reform has been credibly made.

“In the short term, the Trump tariffs are raising prices and limiting access to important goods during a pandemic and a recession. There are even tariffs on needed personal protective equipment such as face masks. There is no justification for such measures.

“In the long term, President Trump’s blatant disregard of a rules-based trading system means countries like China will be less likely to follow the rules themselves. His policies are contrary to the national interest and harm the pandemic response. President Trump should rescind the tariffs regardless of what the WTO says.”

In the News: Antitrust and Amazon

Over at Digital Commerce 360, Don Davis has a thorough writeup about the potential antitrust case against Amazon. He also quotes me a few times. Read the whole thing here.

In the News: Antitrust Hearings

Young Voices’ Casey Givens quotes me on the antitrust hearings in an otherwise-excellent Washington Times op-ed:

Rep. Cicilline was perhaps the worst offender on the former point. As the Competitive Enterprise Institute’s Ryan Young points out, the congressman claimed that “Amazon controls 70 percent of ‘online marketplaces,’” when in fact that is, “equivalent to about 4 or 5 percent of retail sales.” The congressman also made some questionable claims about Google’s market share, conflating its search engine with all searches on the internet.

Read the whole thing here.

In the News – Canadian Tariffs

Thomas Howell, Jr. from The Washington Times quotes me in a story about President Trump’s reinstatement of 10 percent aluminum tariffs against Canada:

“The timing is just terrible. The USMCA trade agreement is barely a month old, the economy is fresh off the worst quarter in American history, and here comes a tax increase on something everyone uses. It makes no sense politically, let alone economically,” said Ryan Young, a senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute.

On the Radio – GDP and Economic Recovery

Earlier this week I appeared on Paul Molloy’s radio down in Florida. We talked about the second-quarter GDP crash, why it was 9.5 percent or 7 percent instead of 32.9 percent, why it was still the worst in U.S. history, and how people can get out of it while staying safe from COVID-19.

The 15-minute-ish segment is online and starts at about 10:40 into this hour-long block.

On the Radio – COVID-19 and Economic Recovery

Tomorrow morning (August 9), I’ll be on the Bab Zadek show from 8:00-9:00 PT (that’s 10-12 CT and 11-12 ET) for the whole hour. It airs on most of the West Coast, and live online here.

In the News: Lowering Tariffs

Bloomberg’s Ana Monteiro was kind enough to quote from my tariff relief paper in a recent piece:

While some duties have been relaxed to help with importing inputs needed for the coronavirus response, repealing tariffs related to health care altogether is something that Ryan Young, a senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, in a July 8 paper said would have the immediate benefit of lowering costs for equipment and medical treatments. He argued that removing all duties imposed since 2017 would “aid economic recovery by reducing businesses’ supply costs,” and provide them some regulatory certainty.

The CEI’s Young also called for tariff-making authority to be moved back to Congress. That would mean repealing:

  • Section 232 of the 1962 Trade Expansion Act, which allows for tariffs without a vote by Congress if imports are deemed a national-security threat;

  • Sections 201 of the 1974 Trade Act, which gives the president authority to impose trade restrictions;

  • Section 301 of the 1974 Trade Act, which President Donald Trump has used to impose tariffs on French and Chinese goods.

Read the whole article here. The paper is here.

In the News: Tariff Reform in the CBC

It’s not often that phrases such as “institution-level reforms” and “never needed” appear in state-run media at all, let alone favorably. I am pleased this happened in a recent article on trade policy in Canada’s CBC:

In a report issued Wednesday, the U.S.-based Competitive Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank, urged the Trump administration to get rid of all tariffs.

“Tariff reform should have been a priority before the coronavirus hit, but now it’s even more urgent to lift trade barriers, in particular for health care supplies and treatments,” said Ryan Young, CEI senior fellow and author of the report, in a statement.

“Tariffs were never needed in the first place, and they are causing harm during a potentially Depression-level economy. The time to act is now.”

Among other things, the report calls on Congress to “make big-picture, institution-level reforms to U.S. trade policy” — including the repeal of Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 and Sections 201 and 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 — to “restore tax authority to the legislature and make trade policy less subject to presidential whim.”

CEI is misidentified as conservative rather than liberal, in the correct sense of the word. But there are bigger battles to fight. The full article is here; my recent paper on tariff relief is here.

In the News: Tariff Relief

Reason‘s Eric Boehm was kind enough to draw on my recent paper on tariff reform in a piece urging the inclusion of tariff relief in the next coronavirus stimulus bill. The article is here; the paper is here.