Third Antitrust Suit against Google since October Based on Flawed Argument

This press release was originally posted on cei.org.

A coalition of more than 30 states and territories today filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, alleging the search engine has abused its power in markets ranging from voice assistants to digital advertising in an attempt to maintain a monopoly over internet searches. The antitrust lawsuit is the third filed against Google since October.

CEI Senior Fellow Ryan Young said:

“Today’s antitrust lawsuit, the third against Google since October, has a major flaw: the dozen keystrokes argument. It is not difficult to type bing.com or duckduckgo.com into your browser. Google pays Apple as much as $12 billion per year to Apple to have Google be its default search engine. This is apparently not enough to prevent Apple from reportedly building up its own search engine.

“Nor was Microsoft’s similar default status for its Internet Explorer browser enough to stave off competition from Firefox, Google Chrome, Apple Safari, and other browsers. Just as Microsoft never actually controlled the browser market, Google does not control the search market. Consumers do.”

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