Stanley Kim Robinson – Green Mars (Mars Trilogy, Book Two)

Kim Stanley Robinson – Green Mars

The second volume of Robinson’s Mars trilogy, and more enjoyable than the first. The characters, style, setting, main plot points, and stylistic conventions were established in the first book, so this book can get to the point more quickly. Red Mars began with a barren, untouched planet with its first hundred colonists just getting started in 2026 (the series came out in the 1990s). By the end, 35 years of active terraforming and immigration were making a noticeable difference in habitability, and Mars even had its first political revolution in 2061. Green Mars starts several decades after that revolution.

Political stability and ongoing terraforming lead to Mars being able to sustain first lichens, and then plants in its thickening atmosphere and warming climate. Robinson shines as he describes the various terraforming methods they try, ranging from solar arrays in space that increase Mars’ solar gain to inducing volcanism to release greenhouse gases. By the end of the book, Mars has warmed enough to have some liquid surface water here and there—hence the third book’s title, Blue Mars. The atmosphere has also thickened and warmed enough for humans to breathe with only the aid of a breathing mask and some warm clothing. This comes in handy, as the book ends with another revolution and Mars declaring its independence from Earth.

Comments are closed.