The New Theories of Moral Sentiments

Dalibor Rohac profiles Deirdre McCloskey and her unconventional approach to economics in today’s Wall Street Journal:

Ms. McCloskey sees a problem in the way that economic models are dominated by a strange, sociopathic character—”Max U” as she calls him, referring to the standard economic problem of maximizing utility subject to various constraints. Her own scholarly work has become increasingly focused on bringing love, hope, faith, courage and other virtues back into economics…

[R]ecall that in 1759 Adam Smith earned his reputation by publishing “The Theory of Moral Sentiments,” in which he accounted for the emergence of sympathy and moral judgments. It was only in the 20th century that ethics disappeared from economics, partly as a result of the increased mathematization of the discipline. Ms. McCloskey says it was a fundamental error for economists to start making their arguments in terms of “Max U” alone. “In fact, ‘Max U’ would be a much more sensible person if he had gender change and became ‘Maxine U,'” she chuckles.

Read the whole thing.

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